An Irish (golf) Odyssey

Playing golf in Ireland is like climbing the Kilimandjaro with espadrilles, you feel you can do it but you are slightly helpless. The wind, the rain, the daunting bunkers and the narrow fairways make you act like a dwarf. And yet, once you have survived your eighteen holes, you feel like a hero and you are extremely happy !

Reims, behind the scene

When you say Reims, you think, the famous cathedral where all Kings of France were crowned and which was saved after the first World war by John Rockefeller who partly paid for its reconstruction. Well there is another side to this capital of champagne and I discovered it while playing a golf championship nearby.

Great Britain for ever

On a recent golfing trip to Southern England, playing the unforgettable Rye and Royal St George’s courses, I discovered by chance Goodnestone Park gardens, three miles from our inn and unknown to the inn keeper ! It is “Sissinghurst without the crowds” as a garden critic puts it…

Four ball amateur match play at Morfontaine

  It was an extraordinary final game at Morfontaine golf club, for Vincent and Francois Illouz and Clément Lemaire and Antoine Delon who played 36 holes under pouring rain and during ten hours, last Sunday, for the French amateur Four ball match play competition, Trophée Armand de Gramont.

Sotogrande, a (very private) golf course

I had heard so much about the course from my golfing friends that entering the world of Sotogrande, in southern Spain, was like seeing the Eiffel tower for the first time for an American child. Not only was I not disppointed, I fell under the charm immediately.